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    how to grow salas from a seed

    How to grow leafy greens from a seed

    What are leafy greens?

    Rocket salad, spinach, maché. These are just some of the leafy greens can be used in salads, on sandwiches or eaten as they are. They usually grow fast (especially in hydroponic systems such as Botanic) and require less light and nutrients compared to chili or herbs. Harvest a little each time instead of the whole plant and you will have a big plant that will regrow itself quickly!

    Choosing a variety

    There are several types of salad greens that are more or less suitable to grow in a small container. In this article we will talk about looseleaf salads. Unlike icebergs salads, they don’t form compact ”heads”. They also have a much more delicate, intense taste. You can harvest them leaf by leaf instead of the whole plant and are suitable for small containers.

    Arugula: Also know as rocket salad. It has a strong, peppery taste and originates from the Mediterranean.

    Tatsoi: This fast-growing plant originates from Japan and has a mild mustard-like taste. Instead of growing tall, it grows a lot of small leaves in a foot-wide rosette.

    MachéAlso known as corn salad or lamb’s lettuce. A crisp, dark green salad with a mild, sometimes nutty taste.

    How to grow leafy greensHow to grow from a seed

    Planting the seeds
    Plant the seed in the Botanium and make sure it is barely covered by the growing medium. Put around 3 seeds in the middle for tatsoi, and evenly spread 5 seeds for mahcé and arugula.

    As with chili, If you have a cold window sill, you can speed up the germination by putting the Botanium at a warmer spot until It sprouts and need light.

    Nutrients
    Using Botanium nutrients, start off with 2 pipettes for one full water tank. Next time you refill your tank, add 4 pipettes instead.

    Germination
    The first seedlings should appear in about 14 days. Perhaps 75% of the seeds germinate. Since tatsoi grows so wide, it is best to only keep one of the seedlings and discard the rest. This is not needed for arugula and maché

    Flowering
    It might take a few months for this to happen, but as soon as you see buds or flowers appear, tear them off instantly! The salad turns bitter if you allow the flowers to form. As you don’t need any fruits to form, there is no reason to pollinate the plant.

    Harvesting
    The plants should be ready for harvest already after 30-40 days. Take a few leaves at a time – make sure to always leave the greater part of the plant so it can grow back. Always go for the younger leaves in the middle, they tend to taste the best. When the plant is big and the conditions are right, you can prune it several times per week.

    Light:
    Leafy greens tend to require less light than other edible plants, but they grow leggy if they don’t get enough light. Using a grow lamp is a must If you plan to grow during winter in the north.

    basil

    How to grow basil (and other herbs)

    The king of herbs

    Basil – the immensely popular herb used for pesto, salads and pasta – is even considered holy in some places of the world. Follow this guide to make your holy urban garden tasty and productive.

    Basil grows quite fast and is a good alternative for the impatient grower. As it needs a lot of water, it thrives in the Botanium where it gets watered often and evenly. If you prune it often, you will get a productive plants that will take care of all your basil cravings. Arguably much more practical than buying a plant from the store that is done for once you harvest it.

    Choosing a variety

    The most common type of basil is Genovese. If you ever bought fresh basil from a store, this is probably what you got. Another common variety is Thai basil, that has characteristic pointy leaves. Some basil have a more lemon-ish taste, while others reminds you of liquorice.

    How to grow from a seed

    Planting the seeds
    Plant the seed directly on top of the growing medium in the Botanium. Put around 10 seeds in the middle. As with chili, If you have a cold window sill, you can speed up the germination by putting the Botanium at a warmer spot until It sprouts and need light.

    Nutrients
    Using Botanium nutrients, start off with 4 pipettes for one full water tank. Next time you refill your tank, add 6 pipettes instead.

    Germination
    In only a few days, the first seedlings should appear. Perhaps 60% of the seeds germinate.

    Flowering
    It might take a few months for this to happen, but as soon as you see buds or flowers appear, tear them off instantly! The basil turns bitter if you allow the flowers to form. As you don’t need any fruits to form, there is no reason to pollinate the plant.

    Harvesting
    When the plant has reached around 20 cm, prune it by pinching off the top 4 leaf sets, right above a leaf set. The plant will then get new stems at the nodes (at the intersection of the leaf and stem) and gets bushier each time you do it. When the basil is big and the conditions are right, you can prune it several times per week. Don’t harvest too much – save at least 2/3 of the plant each time so it can grow back.

    Light
    Basil loves sun, so place it in a bright window or under a lamp. As with other plants, they grow leggy if they don’t get enough light. Using a grow lamp is a must If you plan to grow during winter in the north.

    Usage
    Use it in salads, on a pizza or make a pesto. If you harvest more than you can eat – put it in the freezer and use it later. That being said, fresh basil does of course have a superior taste.caprese

    Chili peppers

    How to grow chili peppers

    Hot hot hot!

    What makes chili growing so rewarding is that even a small amount of chili lasts a long time – in contrast to strawberries for instance, which you easily can eat faster than it grows. The active substance in chili is called capsaicin and tricks the tastebuds, mucous membranes and skin to believe it is hot. Birds, however, are not affected by it – a nifty solution for the plants to protects themselves against bugs and still using birds to spread the seeds.

    Choosing a variety

    Once you dive into the world of chili, you will find out that there are a lot of different types of chili. From yellow to black, from mild to super hot. Tall, short, big and small. The super hots can be quite impractical to use since you need so little of them to give an effect.

    chili peppersHow to grow from a seed

    Chili peppers are surprisingly easy to grow. It might not grow as fast as herbs or tomatoes, but in a few months you will get good yield provided you give them a lot of light.

    Planting the seeds
    Put 3 seeds one cm (1/2”) below the surface of the growing medium in your Botanium. The seeds usually germinates in 1-2 weeks. If you have a cold window sill, you can speed up the germination by putting the Botanium at a warmer spot until It sprouts and need light.

    Nutrients
    For the first month, use 3 pipettes of Botanium nutrients for one full water tank. When flowering, use 4 or 5 pipettes instead.

    Germination
    Usually 2/3 of the seeds germinate. Keep the tallest seedling and carefully pull up the other ones. When growing chili, you don’t want more than one plant per Botanium to compete for water and light. Make sure the seedlings get a lot of light!

    Flowering
    In a few months you will have flowers all over the plant. Since it is growing indoors you need to pollinate it yourself (unless you happen to do indoor beekeeping 🙂

    Chili is self pollinating, which means that one plant can pollinate itself. Touch each flower with a brush to spread the pollen. You can also shake the plant, but it is not as reliable.

    It is common for the first flowers to drop, so don’t worry if that happens. They can also drop if it doesn’t get enough light.

    Harvesting
    Most chillies turn red when they are ready to be picked. But there also varieties that are ripe when they are yellow, brown, orange, white and purple. That is why it is good to know how the chili you grow will look when it’s ripe. You can also feel the fruits carefully – when ripe, they turn softer.

    Light
    Chili peppers love to get a lot of sun. Using a grow lamp is a must If you plan to grow chili peppers during winter in the north. bird eye chili

    Usage:

    So now you have a ton of chili. Now what? Well, use it in soups, pasta arrabbiata or chili. Why not make a chili sauce? Actually, we recommend you to use it in everything!

    • Cut the chillies in half and dry the then in an oven. Grind the dry flakes with a coffee grinder, and you’ll have a powder that lasts for a long time.
    • Freeze the chilies and use a small grater to get instant chili flakes on your dish.
    • Make a chili sauce.

    Recommended varieties:

    These are some chillies that we can recommend:

    Numex twilight: Hot as habanero, compact and decorative.

    Aji pinapple: Medium heat, tastes like tropical fruit.

    CGN 21500: Judging by its shape, people doubt its even a chili. But trust us, it is HOT. And among of the tastiest chillies, too.

    Black pearl: A very decorative and compact plant with its black leaves and red, cherry-like fruits.